Financial Independence Progress Report for July 2015

07/31/2015
Emergency Fund ($72K) 100.0% 100.0%
College Fund (80K) 35.00% 35.00%
Passive Income Streams ($4000 pm) $139.55 pm (07/2014)% $319.11 pm (07/2015)
Retirement Fund ($900K) 58.51% 59.10%
Roof for our Family($1 mil) 00.00%
Medical Fund 00.00%
Life Insurance Done (term life insurance payments initiated)

Main Takeaways

  • July is a big letdown w.r.t. dividends compared to June….but, there were no rough spots in July on the personal side. Yeah for that!
    • College fund stayed even again…zero progress for the second straight month is not so good…especially since I pump money into it every month.
    • 401K took a hit in June…so, getting a positive gain in July was good news…not by much, but it is greater than zero ūüôā
  • Passive income for July¬†2015 continued the winning trend vs last year.
    • I compute Passive Income per month as (total passive income in this year) / number of months completed this year.
    • Total passive income is a sum of dividends + capital gains distributions.
    • July¬†Passive Income = (total passive income in this year) / 7== $319.11 pm.
    • Doing it this way keeps the monthly passive income more realistic because I can instantly know which of my monthly expenses are covered by this amount. I keep a separate tracker for this which I will write about at a later date.
  • I made a portfolio change in my IRA…moved some of the profits off to Vanguard REIT Index fund (VGSLX). This is my attempt at investing passively in real estate. I am happy I took this decision….somewhere in September/October time frame, I will think of adding to this REIT pile…I am expecting REITs to go down in ¬†price some more around that time. Lets wait and see!

DIGIT savings‚Ķ.Month 4 update

I started using DIGIT, a new way of squeezing out some extra cash from my¬†bank account, four months ago. I wrote about it¬†here. My goal was to squeeze some leftover money after accounting for all the budgeted categories (expenses, savings and investment goals). Every time the savings account accumulates to a couple hundred bucks, my plan was to withdraw it and apply towards my Financial Independence goals….more specifically, my home down payment fund.

That said, how well did DIGIT save money for me in June?

  • For the month of June¬†2015, DIGIT squirreled away 226.64¬†from my bank account.
    • This is 226.64¬†that I would have spent on something less important than my financial independence goals.
    • Every month, DIGIT is getting more aggressive and squeezing out all the extra fat from my account…way to go!
  • Since signup,¬†DIGIT has saved me $748.50.
    • If money is saved at the same rate for the rest of the year, I will have $1000 (!!) added to my down payment money…this is money I did not know I could save. So, go DIGIT!

But, where is the saved money going? About a month back, I wrote about my plan to benefit from the next recession here. My plan is to buy a house at a price less than the bubblicious prices prevalent in my HCOL area today. So, at the end of every month, the money DIGIT saves for me moves to my home downpayment fund. DIGIT savings is an opportunistic saving for me…apart from the planned savings towards home down payment. I will take the money however I can save it¬†ūüôā

PS: If you want to sign up and try it out, go directly to Digit’s website here at https://digit.co/

If you do sign up at all, please do share your experiences, positive OR negative, via comments on this page. I would love to hear from you on how this works out.

Link to Yahoo Article: http://finance.yahoo.com/news/29-old-invented-painless-way-170000170.html

When you have total control of time, you feel wealthy!

The month of June was a difficult one for me and I re-learnt an important lesson. There was a perfect storm of difficulties i.e. both professional and personal difficulties arriving at the same time and creating havoc.

  • Professionally, my company had a layoff…it was a stressful week while all of this was happening as the laid off folks were not announced at the same time. Fortunately I was not affected, but a friend and colleague was. It left a bad taste in my mouth. Nothing to compare what my friend was going through, but I have been around¬†a few layoffs in my career and it leaves more disgust in its wake each time. My mind was yearning for freedom from all of this for many days. What this event made clear is that¬†the path I am on right now i.e. the path of achieving Financial Independence, is the best choice I could have ever made.
  • Personally, there was a family emergency that forced me to travel across the country and away from my office at the critical time of layoffs. The issue took a week to resolve itself and the resolution was mostly positive. But, while I was spending time out there, my mind kept coming back to my work and the layoff scenario. I know that is really lame, but I kept wishing I had the freedom to spend some more time taking care of the family issue rather than coming back after a week or so.

On my¬†path to Financial Independence, I am learning a lot from my experiences and in a bigger way from all the smart people who share experiences from their financial independence journey. And somehow along the way, my journey has focused mostly on financial goals. Yes, finance is a great part of achieving financial independence, but I think I forgot the true underlying reason to reach for¬†Financial Independence. I would like those who are reading this to pause and rethink the reasons for their FI journey.¬†Anyways, my¬†real reason is hinted in the title of this post, which is a total steal from some wise person. I just do not remember whom¬†to make a proper attribution to….my apologies for this.

True financial independence is not only about having enough money, but it is also about having total control of your time. It is the ability to spend time as you wish and when you wish it. I remember some wise soul saying that everything in life is about trading money for time OR vice versa. FI is about trading money for time i.e. building enough FU money (link below) to be able to gain control of our time in life. The amount of money needed for FI may be different for each person, but once achieved, you have control of how to spend your time and that is being wealthy. While I was waiting for the family situation to resolve itself, I re-learnt this important feeling of wealth. Thanks to June 2015.

PS: I am behind on some of my blog updates and replies to some wonderful comments. My apologies for that along with my promise to get back to them soon.

Links

Financial Independence Progress Report for June 2015

06/30/2015
Emergency Fund ($72K) 100.0% 100.0%
College Fund (80K) 35.00% 35.00%
Passive Income Streams ($4000 pm) $104.34 pm (06/2014)% $277.37 pm (06/2015)
Retirement Fund ($900K) 59.29% 58.51%
Roof for our Family($1 mil) 00.00%
Medical Fund 00.00%
Life Insurance Done (term life insurance payments initiated)

Main Takeaways

  • For me, June is the second biggest month for passive income. So, when I wrote the progress report for May 2015, I was eagerly waiting the end of June. But, June has its own ideas…it was a rough month on the personal and professional side for me and looking at the FI progress report, it looks like FI progress also has some rough spots.
    • College fund stayed even…which is great news actually considering the performance of the stock market this month. But, still, zero progress was depressing.
    • 401K took a hit in June….especially after a great month of May. A 1% drop is a chunky drop and that stings.
  • Passive income for June 2015 increased quite well in comparison to June 2014, even though the mutual funds did take a hit to the principal. This was the only bright spot this month.
    • I compute Passive Income per month as (total passive income in this year) / number of months completed this year.
    • Total passive income is a sum of dividends + capital gains distributions.
    • June Passive Income = (total passive income in this year) / 6 == $277.37 pm.
    • Doing it this way keeps the monthly passive income more realistic because I can instantly know which of my monthly expenses are covered by this amount. I keep a separate tracker for this which I will write about at a later date.

My investments went a bit down this month. So, I am going to look at my mutual fund investments this month and see if there are any investment opportunities to dollar cost average down the cost. More on this later.

Mortgage Case Study 3: $425K mortgage

This post is the third in a three part case study in finding out how much mortgage should I take on to fit into my plan to FI in the next 10 years. The first post is here and the second post is here.

In the first post, I considered the feasibility of a $625K mortgage. My conclusion was that having a $625,000 mortgage will definitely not fit into the 10 year FI plan that I have. From the calculations in that post, we are talking close to a $5000 pm mortgage payment. Adding 5 more years to the FI plan will be sufficient. So, if I get a $625K mortage, the following things have to happen:

  • Pay $5000 pm mortgage
  • Work for 15 more years

In the second post, I considered the feasibility of a $525K mortgage. My conclusion was that having a $525000 mrtgage will not fit into the 10 year FI plan that I have BUT will will fit into 11 years i.e. one more than my 10 year FI plan. So, if I get a $525K mortage, the following things have to happen:

  • Pay $5000 pm mortgage
  • Work for 11 years

Adding one additional year of work seems most acceptable ūüôā

This post will consider a $425K mortgage and see how t fits into my 10 year plan for FI.

My Mortgage Assumptions

The basic assumptions I will make about the mortgage, beyond the max amount of $425000, are:

  • Interest rate per year 4.5
  • Mortgage start date May 2016
  • 30 year mortgage

With that, I am going to crunch some numbers for a 30 year mortgage. My ideal early retirement is in approximately 10 years. But, I cannot afford a 10 year mortgage…trust me on this…I have crunched the numbers and it is not pretty. The best case for me is a 30 year mortgage. Why?

  • It is a safe bet because
    • the monthly payment is the lowest among 10, 15 and 30 year mortgages
    • in case there is a loss of income, having a lower monthly payment is very helpful until the income source restarts
  • It is very flexible
    • If there is money available, then I have the option of paying more to simulate a 10 or 15 year mortgage

Hence for safety and flexibility, a 30 year mortgage is the best option for me.

What does my monthly payment look like for a $425,000 mortgage?

I have used a mortgage amortization calculator (link below) which gives me the details on how my monthly mortgage payment is split into interest and principal repayment and how long before my entire loan is repaid. I am going to use that calculator to come up with the nos below.

Case 1

Mortgage term in years 30
Monthly payments $2153 (Total = $2153 pm)

Case 2

Mortgage term in years 30
Monthly payments $2153
Monthly extra payment $800  (Total = $2153+$800 = $2953 pm)

Case 3

Mortgage term in years 30
Monthly payments $2153
Monthly extra payment $1600 (Total = $2153+$1600 = $3753 pm)

Case 4

Mortgage term in years 30
Monthly payments $2660
Monthly extra payment $2847(Total = $2153+$2847= $5000 pm)

This case is a new one for this $425K post to have one case for $5000 monthly payment that was there in the $625K post.

How soon can I pay off the $425,000 mortgage?

Case 1: $2153 pm

Mortgage term in years 30
Monthly payments $2153

DATE         PAYMENT  PRINCIPAL  INTEREST   TOTAL INTEREST       BALANCE
June 2016  $2,153.41  $559.66       $1,593.75    $1,593.75                   $424,440.34
June 2031  $2,153.41  $1,097.81    $1,055.60    $245,164.17               $280,396.50
May 2046   $2,153.41  $2,145.37    $8.05           $350,228.52               $0.00

Repayment time is 20 years.

Case 2: $2953 pm

Mortgage term in years 30
Monthly payments $2153
Monthly extra payment $800

DATE           PAYMENT  PRINCIPAL   INTEREST   TOTAL INTEREST   BALANCE
June 2016    $2,953.41  $1,359.66    $1,593.75     $1,593.75                $423,640.34
June 2031    $2,953.41  $2,667.05    $286.36        $183,263.19            $73,695.52
Sept. 2033    $732.16     $729.42       $2.74           $187,088.56            $0.00

Repayment time is 18 yrs approximately.

Case 3: $3753 pm

Mortgage term in years 30
Monthly payments $2153
Monthly extra payment $1600

DATE          PAYMENT   PRINCIPAL   INTEREST  TOTAL INTEREST  BALANCE
June 2016   $3,753.41   $2,159.66    $1,593.75    $1,593.75              $422,840.34
Sept. 2028  $2,502.98   $2,493.63     $9.35          $129,254.63          $0.00

Repayment time is 12.5 years approximately.

Case 4: $5000 pm

Mortgage term in years 30
Monthly payments $2153
Monthly extra payment $2847

DATE          PAYMENT   PRINCIPAL   INTEREST  TOTAL INTEREST  BALANCE
June 2016  $5,000.41    $3,406.66     $1,593.75   $1,593.75               $421,593.34
Dec. 2024  $2,677.86    $2,667.85     $10.00         $87,719.94            $0.00

Repayment time is 8.5 years.

Additional expenses

In all the above calculations, the astute reader might have noticed that I left out two parts from the above calculation:

  • Property taxes from the calculation.
    • Assuming a 1.25% property tax rate, it is not unreasonable to have a $1000 per month property tax in my HCOL area.¬†But, assuming that this expense is tax deductible, I will ignore this cost.
  • House maintenance expenses
    • From the experience of our current rental, I estimate house maintenance expenses to be¬†roughly about $2500 per year i.e. $appx $200 pm
  • Home insurance
    • Lets estimate this to be $200 pm.

So, approximately $500 more per month needs to be budgeted for house maintenance and insurance expenses.

Conclusion

Having a $425,000 mortgage will definitely fit into the 10 year FI plan that I have. Note that this with a $5000 pm mortgage payment. So, if I get a $425K mortage, the following things have to happen:

  • Pay $5000 pm mortgage
  • Work for 8.5 years

This plan seems the most acceptable one from a money perspective ūüôā

Conclusion from the 3-part mortgage series

I considered three different mortgages and their feasibility to pay them off within my 10 year FI plan and the results are:

  • $625K Mortgage:
    • Pay $5000 pm mortgage
    • Work for 15 more years i.e. 5 more years than my FI period of 10 years
    • PLAN FAILS by 5 years
  • $525K Mortgage:
    • Pay $5000 pm mortgage
    • Work for 11 more years i.e. 1 more years than my FI period of 10 years
    • PLAN FAILS, but only by 1 year
  • $425K Mortgage:
    • Pay $5000 pm mortgage
    • Work for 8.5 years i.e. well into my FI period of 10 years
    • PLAN SUCCEEDS!!

So, the best case scenario for me is a mortgage anywhere between $425K to $525K. Yeah!! I am super happy to have this number!!

Links

Mortgage Case Study 2: $525K mortgage

This post is the second in a three part case study in finding out how much mortgage should I take on to fit into my plan to FI in the next 10 years. The first post is here.

In the first post, I considered the feasibility of a $625K mortgage. My conclusion was that having a $625,000 mortgage will definitely not fit into the 10 year FI plan that I have. From the calculations in that post, we are talking close to a $5000 pm mortgage payment. Adding 5 more years to the FI plan will be sufficient. So, if I get a $625K mortage, the following things have to happen:

  • Pay $5000 pm mortgage
  • Work for 15 more years

This post will consider a $525K mortgage and see if it fits into my 10 year plan for FI.

My Mortgage Assumptions

The basic assumptions I will make about the mortgage, beyond the max amount of $525000, are:

  • Interest rate per year 4.5
  • Mortgage start date May 2016
  • 30 year mortgage

With that, I am going to crunch some numbers for a 30 year mortgage. My ideal early retirement is in approximately 10 years. But, I cannot afford a 10 year mortgage…trust me on this…I have crunched the numbers and it is not pretty. The best case for me is a 30 year mortgage. Why?

  • It is a safe bet because
    • the monthly payment is the lowest among 10, 15 and 30 year mortgages
    • in case there is a loss of income, having a lower monthly payment is very helpful until the income source restarts
  • It is very flexible
    • If there is money available, then I have the option of paying more to simulate a 10 or 15 year mortgage

Hence for safety and flexibility, a 30 year mortgage is the best option for me.

What does my monthly payment look like for a $525,000 mortgage?

I have used a mortgage amortization calculator (link below) which gives me the details on how my monthly mortgage payment is split into interest and principal repayment and how long before my entire loan is repaid. I am going to use that calculator to come up with the nos below.

Case 1

Mortgage term in years 30
Monthly payments $2660      (Total = $2660 pm)

Case 2

Mortgage term in years 30
Monthly payments $2660
Monthly extra payment $800  (Total = $2660+$800 = $3460 pm)

Case 3

Mortgage term in years 30
Monthly payments $2660
Monthly extra payment $1600 (Total = $2660+$1600 = $4260 pm)

Case 4

Mortgage term in years 30
Monthly payments $2660
Monthly extra payment $2340 (Total = $2660+$2340 = $5000 pm)

This case is a new one for this $525K post to have one case for $5000 monthly payment that was there in the $625K post.

How soon can I pay off the $525,000 mortgage?

Case 1: $2660 pm

Mortgage term in years 30
Monthly payments $2660

DATE         PAYMENT    PRINCIPAL    INTEREST   TOTAL INTEREST   BALANCE
June 2016  $2,660.10    $691.35        $1,968.75     $1,968.75                $524,308.65
June 2031  $2,660.10    $1,356.12     $1,303.98     $302,849.86            $346,372.15
May 2046  $2,660.10     $2,650.16     $9.94            $432,635.24            $0.00

Repayment time is 30 years.

Case 2: $3460 pm

Mortgage term in years 30
Monthly payments $2660
Monthly extra payment $800

DATE           PAYMENT  PRINCIPAL   INTEREST   TOTAL INTEREST   BALANCE
June 2016   $3,460.10   $1,491.35    $1,968.75    $1,968.75                 $523,508.65
June 2031   $3,460.10   $2,925.36    $534.74       $240,948.88             $139,671.17
Feb. 2035   $2,947.53   $2,936.51    $11.01         $253,009.45             $0.00

Repayment time is 19 years.

Case 3: $4260

Mortgage term in years 30
Monthly payments $2660
Monthly extra payment $1600

DATE         PAYMENT   PRINCIPAL  INTEREST    TOTAL INTEREST    BALANCE
June 2016  $4,260.10   $2,291.35    $1,968.75    $1,968.75                  $522,708.65
Mar. 2030  $2,914.45   $2,903.56    $10.89          $180,830.60             $0.00

Repayment time is 14 years.

Case 4: $5000

Mortgage term in years 30
Monthly payments $2660
Monthly extra payment $2340

DATE          PAYMENT   PRINCIPAL   INTEREST  TOTAL INTEREST  BALANCE
June 2016   $5,000.10   $3,031.35     $1,968.75   $1,968.75               $521,968.65
July 2027    $3,519.20    $3,506.05    $13.15        $143,532.21            $0.00

Repayment time is 11 years.

Additional expenses

In all the above calculations, the astute reader might have noticed that I left out two parts from the above calculation:

  • Property taxes from the calculation.
    • Assuming a 1.25% property tax rate, it is not unreasonable to have a $1000 per month property tax in my HCOL area.¬†But, assuming that this expense is tax deductible, I will ignore this cost.
  • House maintenance expenses
    • From the experience of our current rental, I estimate house maintenance expenses to be¬†roughly about $2500 per year i.e. $appx $200 pm
  • Home insurance
    • Lets estimate this to be $200 pm.

So, appx $500 more per month needs to be budgeted for house maintenance and insurance expenses.

Conclusion

Even without adding the “Additional¬†expenses”, having a $525,000 mortgage will definitely not fit into the 10 year FI plan that I have. Note that this is even with a $5000 pm mortgage payment. Adding 1 more years to the FI plan will be sufficient. So, if I get a $525K mortage, the following things have to happen:

  • Pay $5000 pm mortgage
  • Work for 11 years

Adding one additional year of work seems most acceptable ūüôā

The next case study (last) will tackle a $425K mortgage.

Links

Financial Independence Progress Report for May 2015

05/31/2015
Emergency Fund ($72K) 100.0% 100.0%
College Fund (80K) 34.54% 35.00%
Passive Income Streams ($4000 pm) $75.95 pm (05/2014)% $191.60 pm (05/2015)
Retirement Fund ($900K) 56.55% 59.29%
Roof for our Family($1 mil) 00.00%
Medical Fund 00.00%
Life Insurance Done (term life insurance payments initiated)

Main Takeaways

  1. February, May, August and November are months with lowest passive incomes. So, nothing great to write about this month of May. Next month is June, the second biggest month for passive income. So, eagerly waiting the end of next month ūüôā
  2. 401K paycheck contribution increases lead to increases in the Retirement Fund and not market performance.
  3. Passive income for May 2015 increased in comparison to May 2014.
    • I compute Passive Income per month as (total passive income in this year) / number of months completed this year.
    • Total passive income is a sum of dividends + capital gains distributions.
    • May Passive Income = (total passive income in this year) / 5 == $191.60pm.
    • Doing it this way keeps the monthly passive income more realistic because I can instantly know which of my monthly expenses are covered by this amount. I keep a separate tracker for this which I will write about at a later date.

DIGIT savings‚Ķ.Month 3 update

I started using DIGIT, a new way of squeezing out some extra cash from my¬†bank account, three months ago. I wrote about it¬†here. My goal was to squeeze some leftover money after accounting for all the budgeted categories (expenses, savings and investment goals). Every time the savings account accumulates to a couple hundred bucks, my plan was to withdraw it and apply towards my Financial Independence goals….more specifically, my home down payment fund.

That said, how well did DIGIT save money for me in May?

  • For the month of May¬†2015, DIGIT has squirreled away 161.86¬†from my bank account.
    • This is 161.86 that I would have spent on something less important than my financial independence goals.
  • Since signup,¬†DIGIT has saved me $521.86.
    • If money is saved at the same rate for the rest of the year, I will have $1000 (!!) added to my down payment money…this is money I did not know I could save. So, go DIGIT!

But, where is the saved money going? About a month back, I wrote about my plan to benefit from the next recession here. My plan is to buy a house at a price less than the bubblicious prices prevalent in my HCOL area today. So, at the end of every month, the money DIGIT saves for me moves to my home downpayment fund. DIGIT savings is an opportunistic saving for me…apart from the planned savings towards home down payment. I will take the money however I can save it¬†ūüôā

PS: If you want to sign up and try it out, go directly to Digit’s website here at https://digit.co/

If you do sign up at all, please do share your experiences, positive OR negative, via comments on this page. I would love to hear from you on how this works out.

Link to Yahoo Article: http://finance.yahoo.com/news/29-old-invented-painless-way-170000170.html

Mortgage Case Study 1: $625K mortgage

This is a three part case study in finding out how much mortage should I take on to fit into my plan to FI in the next 10 years.

I wrote about preparing for the next recession here. In fact, what I really meant is that I want to not just prepare but PROFIT from the next recession instead of bracing myself and riding it out. One of the important lessons I learnt from past recessions, from personal experience and that of others, is as follows:

  • Big items (houses and cars) should always be purchased in a recession or bust period.
  • A mistake make in either of the two can take years and years to recover from‚Ķespecially the house.

My main¬†goal for the next upcoming recession is to buy a home for our family. We have sacrificed a lot over the past years. We had to rent in many places due to affordability issues and my kid has taken the brunt of all the moves…in terms of not having a constant set of friends both at home and in school…especially in school due to the many times we have moved and changed schools. I am ready to put down roots in one place so that my family can settle down.

Questions to answer

I live in a HCOL (high cost of living) area on the west coast. Moving out of¬†here is not an option for me and my family….this is where my¬†family is, this is where my friends are and this is what I call home. So, got to live the life here, including the high cost of housing. So, the questions that come to my mind are:

  • How much does a 3Bed/2Bath home cost in my area?
  • What is the monthly mortgage payment going to look like?
  • How soon can I finish paying for the house? Considering my ideal goal is to reach FI in 10 years……

How much does a 3Bed/2Bath home cost in my area?

As of today (04/20/2015), a reasonable 3B/2B home costs appx $1.2 million dollars. Yep…I am not kidding about this…sad but true. There seems to be no value for money. Since this is way way above my price range, I will wait it out for the next recession to calm the prices down a bit. It may happen in the next year OR the year after….not sure. But, whatever the cost of the house is, here are my rules:

  • I will not get a mortgage above $625,000.
    • This is the jumbo loan limit and I am not paying Mortgage Insurance and not maxing out my financial slavery.
  • Since the higher limit on my mortgage is fixed, the rest of the money has to come from the down payment
    • If I have $300,000 for¬†down payment, then I can afford a house that costs $925,000
    • If I have $200,000 for down payment, then I can afford a house that costs $825,000
    • If I have $150,000 for down payment, then I can afford a house that costs $725,000

Doing it this way, I can calculate the worst possible price and anything under will be a nice to have! Assuming that, I am going to crunch numbers on a $625,000 mortgage and calculate the following:

  • What does my monthly payment look like for a $625,000 mortgage?
  • How soon can I pay off the $625,000 mortgage?

My Mortgage Assumptions

The basic assumptions I will make about the mortgage, beyond the max amount of $625000, are:

  • Interest rate per year 4.5
  • Mortgage start date May 2016
  • 30 year mortgage

With that, I am going to crunch some numbers for a 30 year mortgage. My ideal early retirement is in approximately 10 years. But, I cannot afford a 10 year mortgage…trust me on this…I have crunched the numbers and it is not pretty. The best case for me is a 30 year mortgage. Why?

  • It is a safe bet because
    • the monthly payment is the lowest among 10, 15 and 30 year mortgages
    • in case there is a loss of income, having a lower monthly payment is very helpful until the income source restarts
  • It is very flexible
    • If there is money available, then I have the option of paying more to simulate a 10 or 15 year mortgage

Hence for safety and flexibility, a 30 year mortgage is the best option for me.

What does my monthly payment look like for a $625,000 mortgage?

I have used a mortgage amortization calculator (link below) which gives me the details on how my monthly mortgage payment is split into interest and principal repayment and how long before my entire loan is repaid. I am going to use that calculator to come up with the nos below.

Case 1

Mortgage term in years 30
Monthly payments $3,166.78

Case 2

Mortgage term in years 30
Monthly payments $3,166.78
Monthly extra payment $800

Case 3

Mortgage term in years 30
Monthly payments $3,166.78
Monthly extra payment $1600

How soon can I pay off the $625,000 mortgage?

Case 1: $3166 pm

Mortgage term in years 30
Monthly payments $3,166.78

DATE          PAYMENT   PRINCIPAL   INTEREST   TOTAL INTEREST   BALANCE
June 2016  $3,166.78      $823.03          $2,343.75      $2,343.75                    $624,176.97
June 2031  $3,166.78      $1,614.42        $1,552.36     $360,535.55                $412,347.79
May 2046  $3,166.78      $3,154.95        $11.83           $515,041.95                $0.00

Repayment time is 30 years.

Case 2: $3966 pm

Mortgage term in years 30
Monthly payments $3,166.78
Monthly extra payment $800

DATE          PAYMENT   PRINCIPAL   INTEREST   TOTAL INTEREST   BALANCE
June 2016  $3,966.78     $1,623.03       $2,343.75      $2,343.75                     $623,376.97
June 2031  $3,966.78     $3,183.67        $783.11         $298,634.57                 $205,646.81
April 2036  $2,998.48    $2,987.27       $11.20            $322,092.87                $0.00

Repayment time is 20 years.

Case 3: $4766 pm

Mortgage term in years 30
Monthly payments $3,166.78
Monthly extra payment $1600

DATE           PAYMENT   PRINCIPAL   INTEREST   TOTAL INTEREST   BALANCE
June 2016   $4,766.78     $2,423.03        $2,343.75      $2,343.75                    $622,576.97
June 2031   $3,712.62     $3,698.75        $13.87            $236,733.59                $0.00

Repayment time is 15 years.

Missing expenses

In all the above calculations, the astute reader might have noticed that I left out two parts from the above calculation:

  • Property taxes from the calculation.
    • Assuming a 1.25% property tax rate, it is not unreasonable to have a $1000 per month property tax in my HCOL area.
    • But, assuming that this expense is tax deductible, I will ignore this cost.
  • House maintenance expenses
    • From the experience of our current rental, I estimate house maintenance expenses to be¬†roughly about $2500 per year i.e. $appx $200 pm
  • Home insurance
    • Lets estimate this to be $200 pm.

So, appx $500 more per month needs to be budgeted for house maintenance and insurance expenses.

Conclusion

Even without adding the “Missing expenses”, having a $625,000 mortgage will definitely not fit into the 10 year FI plan that I have. Note that we are talking close to a $5000 pm mortgage payment. Adding 5 more years to the FI plan will be sufficient. So, if I get a $625K mortage, the following things have to happen:

  • Pay $5000 pm mortgage
  • Work for 15 more years

The next two case studies will tackle a $525K mortgage and a $425K mortgage.

Links

DIGIT savings‚Ķ.Month 2 update

I started using DIGIT, a new way of squeezing out some extra cash from my¬†bank account, two months ago. I wrote about it¬†here. My goal was to squeeze some leftover money after accounting for all the budgeted categories (expenses, savings and investment goals). Every time the savings account accumulates to a couple hundred bucks, my plan was to withdraw it and apply towards my Financial Independence goals….more specifically, my home down payment fund.

That said, how well did DIGIT save money for me in April? Quite well in fact. For the month of April 2015, DIGIT has squirreled away 238.29 from my bank account. I got a tax refund that I was a bit lazy in moving towards a goal. DIGIT pounced on it and increased the savings rate automatically. This is good in two ways for me:

  • This is 238.29¬†I did know I could live without and
  • This is 238.29¬†that I would have spent on something less important than my financial independence goals.

Since signup, DIGIT has saved me $360….this is money I did not know I could save. So, go DIGIT!

But, where is the saved money going? About a month back, I wrote about my plan to benefit from the next recession here. My plan is to buy a house at a price less than the bubblicious prices prevalent in my HCOL area today. So, at the end of every month, the money DIGIT saves for me moves to my home downpayment fund. DIGIT savings is an opportunistic saving for me…apart from the planned savings towards all my goals, including home down payment. I will take¬†money however I can save it¬†ūüôā

PS: If you want to sign up and try it out, go directly to Digit’s website here at https://digit.co/

If you do sign up at all, please do share your experiences, positive OR negative, via comments on this page. I would love to hear from you on how this works out.

Link to Yahoo Article: http://finance.yahoo.com/news/29-old-invented-painless-way-170000170.html